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Latin Roots: It Takes Two - Tango Essentials…
World Cup Begins –Latin Roots Brings Us The “Official” (And Not So Official) Music
Latin Roots: Nueva Trova from Cuba Transcends It’s State-Supported Origins

April 10, 2014 - Producer Aaron Levinson is back with a new Latin Roots segment on Nueva Trova, a style of music that started in Castro's Cuba in the 1960's but continues today. It started as a political music celebrating the ideals of the revolution but the music lives on, not just in Cuba but abroad.
Fortunately there was a great choice for our Sense of Place: Austin Latin Roots segment. It is Grupo Fantasma a 9 piece Latin band that formed in 2000.
Our very popular Latin Roots series continues today as producer Aaron Levinson joins us to talk about what he says is often referred to as "Puerto Rican Hillbilly Music." It's called jibaro and it is music that originated in the Puerto Rican countryside. Although the island is getting more and more urbanized, Aaron says jibaro still has its proponents. We will hear a couple of songs.
Josh begins by talking about how the first South American rock bands of the 50s and 60s were all cover bands, often singing in English.

The covers that come out now are more Latinized and musically interesting in his opinion. The first song he plays is his favorite cover from last year by a Mexican band called Los Master Plus. They first broke out with a cumbia version of Kings of Leon's "Sex on Fire", but since Josh is a Radiohead fan, he plays their cumbia cover of Creep, "El Extrano".

This session of World Cafe’s Latin Roots music series is hosted by Chicago-based journalist Catalina Maria Johnson. She writes in Spanish and English for publications such as HOY, Revista Contratiempo, Gozamos and Nat Geo Music and is a regular radio personality and hosts/producer for the radio program Beat Latino, which airs in Chicago, Mexico City and Berlin.

San Antonio native Alejandro Escovedo is the co-host of this sixteenth installment of Latin Roots, here to discuss the Latin character of his hometown's music in the 1950's.

Escovedo's music has a strong Latin influence as a result of growing up in San Antoinio and listening to his parent's music. His Dad played mariachi, and his parents also to rancheras, country, and big band music - which all seeped into what he does today.

Grammy award-winning Latin music producer and music industry veteran Aaron Levinson joins WXPN’s David Dye for this seventeenth segment of the Latin Roots music series. Levinson is a Philadelphia native and started his music career at Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts. He has a background as a musician and composer and is an ASCAP-affiliated songwriter/ publisher and former governor of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

It's time once again for Latin Roots, our ongoing series highlighting different genres of Latin music. Today Catalina Maria Johnson from Chicago Public Radio's Beat Latino joins us to discuss Judeo-Iberian music or Ladino. This music goes back over 500 years and represents a dying tradition and a dying language. As Catalina tells us in many way it's the music that is keeping the language alive, often in the form of lullabies.

December 25, 2012 - In this edition of World Cafe, Beat Latino host Catalina Maria Johnson sits down with host David Dye to discuss the Christmas music traditions of Latin America. One thing that sets Central America's music apart from that of North America, she says, is the fact that a lot of it is made for dancing!
Chavela Vargas We are back with another of our popular Latin Roots series. This time Felix Contreras from NPR's Alt-Latino is here to explore the Ranchera. We'll hear old and new examples of this Mexican narrative form. The first song is by Jorge Negrete, one of the most famous Ranchera singers of all time.
In this installment of the Latin Roots series, Raul Pacheco from the Grammy award-winning Latin band Ozomatli talks with WXPN’s David Dye about how politics influence music. Pacheco knows a lot about this topic, as Ozomatli have been a politically-driven band from their inception.

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