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Latin Roots

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About Latin Roots

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Latin Roots

Rachel Faro Takes Us To Uruguay For The African Influenced Style Candombe Record producer and recording artist Rachel Faro returns to Latin Roots to discuss a musical style from the sometimes overlooked country of Uruguay. Separated by a river from Argentina and nestled next to southern Brazil, Uruguay had the same influx of African slaves as Brazil with a similar musical results. In Uruguay the Afro-Uruguayan form is Candombe.
Latin Roots Jasmine Garsd With Some Spooky Legends For The Day Of The Dead October 31, 2013 - In the Latin world the big celebration this time of year is for The Day of The Dead, not Halloween. Jasmine Garsd of NPR ‘s Alt.Latino explains in our Latin Roots segment that The Day Of The Dead is far more a day of remembrance than anything scary.
Latin Roots: Aaron Levinson Highlights Little Known Style Choro Choro is yet another style of Brazilian music that is hybrid of European and African Influences. It started in the 19th century as the Portuguese flooded into Rio. Aaron Levinson is here to play a couple of examples for us. One from the mid-40’s has a kind of “Hot Club of France” jazz feel. The more modern example is actually from Israel where bands are keeping…
Latin Roots – The Evolution of Cuba’s Charanga Music Originally evolving out of the more formal 19th century style danzon, things changed for charanga music in the 1930’s as we will hear with a transformative piece by the legendary Cachao. It’s interesting that this very Cuban form has been kept alive since the early days of the Cuban revolution – when there were few places to play on the island – by Puerto Rican musicians…
It’s time for another Latin Roots today as Ernesto Lechner, co-host of The Latin Alternative radio show, is here to talk about a very romantic style of Latin music, balada. Ernesto will play us a couple of examples of the style starting in the late 1960’s when a lot of authentic balada drew from jazz and even bossa nova. We’ll also hear a modern rendition from Babasonicos from Argentina.
Ernesto Lechner talks about his favorite singer, Joe Arroyo, an influential Columbian musician. He began singing at the age of 10 in the whorehouses of Cartagena. He was discovered by Fruko when he was a teenager and joined Fruko's band, Fruko Y Sus Tesos. In the 1980s, Arroyo pursued a solo career. He established a unique tropical sound called "Joeson" ("Joe's sound") that mixes salsa, calypso, zouk, compas, meringue, cumbia, and Columbian folklore.
When Catalina Maria Johnson told us she wanted to highlight the “coastal music “of Colombia we didn’t even consider that there would be two parts to that because there are two coasts! Today we look at the music of Colombia’s Caribbean coast with a couple of selections that indicate the isolation of African slaves on either coast.
The Pacific Coast with Catalina Maria Johnson August 8, 2013 - Today we hear music from the Pacific coast which is dominated by marimba. Colombia has a large Afro Colombian population, up to 80% of the country is of African descent. Our Latin Roots guest today, Catalina Maria Johnson, from the Chicago based program Beat Latino, plays music from the coastal areas where that population is concentrated. It turns out that geography plays a major…
Another live session for Latin Roots as we travel to Fidel Nadal’s home studio in Buenos Aires for a session with a man who owns his genre: Argentine Reggae.
On our recent World Cafe Travel Adventure to Buenos Aires we learned one thing right away: Argentineans may be known for tango, but really, they like to rock! We were invited to the home studio of Catupecu Machu, one of Argentina's most popular bands.
We welcome back Judy Cantor-Navas, Managing Editor of Billboard En Espanol for this Latin Roots segment on flamenco. Much about the origins of this music is contested. Yes, it is now strongly associated with Spain but some say its beginnings actually stretch back to India. It is also strongly associated with the Spanish city of Sevilla but Judy tells us that is also contested.
It didn't just develop, it exploded in popularity through the 90's. Post-Revolution, after training in jazz and classical conservatories, many Cuban musicians were looking for something new that would challenge their skills. Timba developed as a music combining Rumba with other dance music including even funk.
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Latin Roots is made possible by a grant from the Wyncote Foundation.